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Canada: Man aims laser at aircraft, police; results in 14 criminal charges

The following press release dated July 22 2020 is from the City of Calgary Newsroom:


Charges laid after laser pointed at HAWCS and patrol units


Investigators have laid multiple drug, weapons and Aeronautics Act charges following an incident where a laser was pointed at several officers.

On Friday, July 17, 2020, at approximately 2:50 a.m., Helicopter Air Watch for Community Safety (HAWCS) was responding to a call for service when a laser was pointed into the eyes of the Tactical Flight Officer working in HAWCS. Minutes later, a laser was also shone into the eyes of patrol officers who were in two different marked police vehicles in the downtown area. The Tactical Flight Officer was able to determine that the source of the laser came from an apartment located in the 200 block of 15 Avenue S.E.

Patrol units attended the apartment and conducted a door knock, however the occupants refused to answer the door. Later that day, investigators were able to collect additional evidence and as a result conducted a search warrant on the apartment.

The following items were seized during the search:
  • 993.2 grams of methamphetamine, worth approximately $60,000
  • $20,725 in Canadian currency
  • A Class 3B laser
  • Approximately 20 kg of an unknown substance, suspected to be a cutting agent
  • A sawed-off shotgun
  • A Browning .308 Winchester rifle
  • Numerous rounds of ammunition
  • Other items related to drug trafficking and fraud
Kamran Sattar, 44, of Calgary has been charged with 14 criminal offences including possession of a controlled substance for the purpose of trafficking, obstruction of a peace officer, possession of a restricted/prohibited firearm with ammunition, careless storage of a firearm and breach of probation. Sattar was also charged with two offences under the Canadian Aviation Regulations and Aeronautics Act including projection of a directed bright light source at an aircraft and creating a hazard to safety.

“Pointing a laser at an aircraft is a serious offence that we will investigate thoroughly,” says Staff Sergeant Jodi Gach of the CPS District 1 General Investigations Unit. “In this case, investigators came together very quickly to identify the offender, and as a result a significant amount of methamphetamine and firearms were seized by police.”




Laser seized Canada Calgary 2020-07-17 squashed

Above: Police photo of laser seized from Kamran Sattar. Below: Similar-looking lasers are available on eBay's U.S. site. The seller states this laser is 5 milliwatts — the highest legal power for a laser to be sold as a pointer in the U.S.

Laser similar to seized Canada Calgary 2020-07-17 squashed

Canada: Edmonton woman charged with aiming laser at police helicopter

Sarah Schenker, 28, was said to have repeatedly aimed a laser pointer at an Edmonton Police Service air crew, early on the morning of July 11 2017.

She was arrested and charged with endangering the safety of an aircraft in flight. Schenker faces a maximum jail sentence of five years, and a fine up to $100,000.

A police spokesperson said their helicopters experience about six laser pointer incidents each year. He said “It’s been fairly quiet lately, which is really good.”

From the Edmonton Journal, and RedDeer News Now via the Canadian Press

Canada: Pilot goes to doctor; subsequent flight canceled after laser illuminates WestJet

Green laser light aimed at a WestJet aircraft on August 22 2016 caused a pilot to seek medical attention after the flight landed in Fort McMurray, Alberta. This, in turn, caused a subsequent flight to be canceled until a new pilot could be brought in.

The severity of the medical complaint, and the pilot’s diagnosis and treatment, were not known. A WestJet spokesperson cited privacy concerns.

The Boeing 737 flight originated in Toronto. The laser was said to have come from “a wooded area in the middle of nowhere”, when the plane was at about 3,500 feet altitude.

According to CBC, there were 40 laser incidents reported in Alberta in May 2016, and 500 incidents in all of Canada in 2015. (According to the Ottawa Citizen, there were 502 laser illuminations in the Transport Canada CADORS database in 2014, and 663 incidents in 2015.)

Royal Canadian Mounted Police from the regional municipality of Wood Buffalo were investigating the incident.

From CBC, CTV News and the National Post

Canada: Pilots, drivers report laser flashes near Calgary airport

A green laser was pointed at two commercial aircraft pilots at about 10:30 pm on May 13 2014. The laser came from the Signal Hill community of Calgary, located about 8 miles (13 km) from Calgary International Airport. A Calgary Police Service helicopter was dispatched but did not see the laser light.

About one hour later, a driver reported being blinded by a light in the same area.

Police asked anyone with information to call their Crime Stoppers line.

From 660 News

Canada: Two Edmonton incidents highlight increased aiming at police

Police in Edmonton held a news conference to discuss the increasing risk to their flight operations. As of September 9 2013, there have been 10 such incidents. This compares with 9 incidents in all of 2012, and 4 incidents in 2011.

These are the two most recent Edmonton incidents:

  • On September 6 2013, the city police Air-1 helicopter was repeatedly hit by a laser in the west Edmonton area. Two teens were arrested, a 17-year-old male and a 15-year-old female; charges are pending.

  • On September 7 2013, multiple arrests were made after Air-1 was hit for several minutes in north Edmonton. Three males, aged 18, 19 and 20, were charged with assault with a weapon, possession of an offensive weapon, endangering the safety of an aircraft in flight, and creating a hazard to aviation safety.

During the press event, police said that users ignore warnings that come with lasers, that they often don’t realize or understand the hazard, that a ban on lasers is not the answer, and that their pilots do fly with laser protective eyewear. Details are at this LaserPointerSafety.com story.

From the Edmonton Journal and Edmonton Sun. Thanks to Keith Murland for bringing this to our attention.

Canada: Teen arrested in Calgary for temporarily blinding police pilot with laser

19-year-old Michael Sanche was arrested on five charges after illuminating a Calgary police helicopter three times on August 1 2013. Police said there is no known motive although alcohol may have been a factor.

Calgary police laser protective anti-laser goggle glasses
A Calgary police officer holds up protective glasses of the type used by air crews to protect from laser pointers and other bright lights


During the incident, the pilot put on protective eyewear specifically designed for laser incidents. The tactical flight officer was said to have “extreme anxiety” and was temporarily flashblinded during the incident. Afterwards he had “spotty blindness and a minor headache.” Police said the Class 3 laser was capable of causing permanent blindness and burning skin.

Click to read more...

Canada: Man arrested for aiming at Calgary police helicopter

David Palvialok, 35, was arrested for aiming a green laser beam at a police helicopter on October 25 2011. Calgary police were responding to a disturbance when they saw the beam. They tracked the laser and arrested Palvialok. He was charged with obstructing a peace officer, mischief, endangering the safety of an aircraft in flight, and creating a hazard to aviation safety.

From 660 News and CBC News

Canada: Calgary laser incidents highlight growing concern

An Air Canada Jazz flight, and a WestJet flight on final approach to Calgary International Airport had their cockpits illuminated by a green laser, on September 18 2011. There were no injuries to the pilots. Police are searching an area between downtown Calgary and 36th Street S.E., but as of October 5 have not found any suspects.

There were 182 laser illuminations in Canada in 2010, according to Transport Canada. Fourteen of these took place in Alberta.

From the
Calgary Herald

Canada: $5000 fine for aiming at three aircraft

On July 26 2011, a 39-year-old Calgary man was fined CDN $5000 for aiming a “Class 3” green laser pointer at a small plane, a small jet and a traffic helicopter. Chris Saulnier pleaded guilty to the January 5 2011 illuminations. He was identified via video taken from the helicopter and turned over to the police.

His lawyer said Saulnier had an interest in astronomy, and was “not thinking about the consequences, he’s just thinking and wondering whether his beam can hit what he thought was the belly of the airplane.... In hindsight, he knows the seriousness of it and accepts responsibility...”

From the
Calgary Herald

UPDATE July 28 2011: Representatives of the Calgary Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada said Saulnier was not a RASC member, and did not represent responsible amateur astronomy. More details are here.

Canada: Man gets lower fine, in part because pilot did not lose control

In a case which may have Canadian implications for laser users’ defense, a judge reduced the fine for an Edmonton man charged with creating a hazard to aviation safety.

Provincial Judge Paul Sully said the August 19 2009 incident was "not as serious” as the prosecutor described, since the pilot did not lose control, but instead was "momentarily blinded from viewing his instruments [and] was able to complete his orbits.” In addition, the judge noted that the pilot was familiar with the dangers of laser light.

Judge Sully also rejected the prosecution’s notion that the man should have culpability: “The offender had a momentary loss of common sense which resulted from his failure to recognize the high standard of care needed when handling a laser.”Click to read more...

Canada: More incidents; man fined $1000